Tomorrow’s Web Standards

Premise

I hope by the end of this article you will have a good grasp on the current draft of upcoming web standards. This includes HTML5, CSS3 and newer JavaScript updates.

I’m going to assume that you are up-to-date on current web standards. If you do not know HTML5 or XHTML, CSS, or JavaScript then this article is not for you. I suggest you come back after obtaining a basic understanding of the three.

Also note that most links in this article will direct to w3.org or w3schools.com. Those are the two leading websites for any web based information you can find. Some other sites can provide more detail and are sometimes a bit clearer, but those two sites should be your first stop in the world of web development.

The HTML5 Umbrella Myth

When most people hear of our upcoming web standards, they tend to lump CSS3 and newer JavaScript solutions into HTML5 explanations. Right off the bat, I want to clarify that confusion. HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript are three completely separate languages, but have a huge impact on each other. When the new standards are solidified, it will be impossible to build a well presented website/page without both HTML5 and CSS3 being used. If you want any user interaction at all, you will need to add JavaScript. Although JavaScript has been around a while, new methods and events are being created to interact with the new elements and properties.

Official Start Date of the New Web Standards?

While not yet accepted in final draft, HTML5 and CSS3 are supported to a good extend in most modern web browsers. The biggest exception to this is Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. They are usually two years behind in accepting most W3 standards. And even when the newest standards are accepted, there’s no law stating that browsers must implement every aspect. Until then, you can always start building web solutions for browsers that already support the greatly needed modifications. Here’s a rather comprehensive list.

HTML5 & CSS3 Support

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