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A: Using non-Java code

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This appendix was contributed by and used with the permission of Andrea Provaglio ( www.AndreaProvaglio.com).

The Java language and its standard API are rich enough to write full-fledged applications. But in some cases you must call non-Java code; for example, if you want to access operating-system-specific features, interface with special hardware devices, reuse a pre-existing, non-Java code base, or implement time-critical sections of code. Interfacing with non-Java code requires dedicated support in the compiler and in the Virtual Machine, and additional tools to map the Java code to the non-Java code. (There’s also a simple approach: in Chapter 15, the section titled “a Web application” contains an example of connecting to non-Java code using standard input and output.) Currently, different vendors offer different solutions: Java 1.1 has the Java Native Interface (JNI), Netscape has proposed its Java Runtime Interface, and Microsoft offers J/Direct, Raw Native Interface (RNI), and Java/COM integration.



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