Summary

Bruce Eckel's Thinking in Java Contents | Prev | Next

This chapter shows some of the more sophisticated things that you can do with Java. It also makes the point that while Java must certainly have its limits, those limits are primarily relegated to performance. (When the text-processing programs were written, for example, C++ versions were much faster – this might be due partly to an inefficient implementation of the IO library, which should change in time.) The limits of Java do not seem to be in the area of expressiveness. Not only does it seem possible to express just about everything you can imagine, but Java seems oriented toward making that expression easy to write and read. Therefore you don’t run into the wall of complexity that often occurs with languages that are more trivial to use than Java (at least they seem that way, at first). And with Java 1.2’s JFC/Swing library, even the expressiveness and ease of use of the AWT is improving dramatically.



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