The observer pattern

Bruce Eckel's Thinking in Java Contents | Prev | Next

//: BoxObserver.java
// Demonstration of Observer pattern using
// Java's built-in observer classes.
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.util.*;
 
// You must inherit a new type of Observable:
class BoxObservable extends Observable {
  public void notifyObservers(Object b) {
    // Otherwise it won't propagate changes:
    setChanged();
    super.notifyObservers(b);
  }
}
 
public class BoxObserver extends Frame {
  Observable notifier = new BoxObservable();
  public BoxObserver(int grid) {
    setTitle("Demonstrates Observer pattern");
    setLayout(new GridLayout(grid, grid));
    for(int x = 0; x < grid; x++)
      for(int y = 0; y < grid; y++)
        add(new OCBox(x, y, notifier));
  }   
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    int grid = 8;
    if(args.length > 0)
      grid = Integer.parseInt(args[0]);
    Frame f = new BoxObserver(grid);
    f.setSize(500, 400);
    f.setVisible(true);
    f.addWindowListener(
      new WindowAdapter() {
        public void windowClosing(WindowEvent e) {
          System.exit(0);
        }
      });
  }
}
 
class OCBox extends Canvas implements Observer {
  Observable notifier;
  int x, y; // Locations in grid
  Color cColor = newColor();
  static final Color[] colors = { 
    Color.black, Color.blue, Color.cyan, 
    Color.darkGray, Color.gray, Color.green,
    Color.lightGray, Color.magenta, 
    Color.orange, Color.pink, Color.red, 
    Color.white, Color.yellow 
  };
  static final Color newColor() {
    return colors[
      (int)(Math.random() * colors.length)
    ];
  }
  OCBox(int x, int y, Observable notifier) {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
    notifier.addObserver(this);
    this.notifier = notifier;
    addMouseListener(new ML());
  }
  public void paint(Graphics  g) {
    g.setColor(cColor);
    Dimension s = getSize();
    g.fillRect(0, 0, s.width, s.height);
  }
  class ML extends MouseAdapter {
    public void mousePressed(MouseEvent e) {
      notifier.notifyObservers(OCBox.this);
    }
  }
  public void update(Observable o, Object arg) {
    OCBox clicked = (OCBox)arg;
    if(nextTo(clicked)) {
      cColor = clicked.cColor;
      repaint();
    }
  }
  private final boolean nextTo(OCBox b) {
    return Math.abs(x - b.x) <= 1 && 
           Math.abs(y - b.y) <= 1;
  }
} ///:~ 

When you first look at the online documentation for Observable, it’s a bit confusing because it appears that you can use an ordinary Observable object to manage the updates. But this doesn’t work; try it – inside BoxObserver, create an Observable object instead of a BoxObservable object and see what happens: nothing. To get an effect, you must inherit from Observable and somewhere in your derived-class code call setChanged( ). This is the method that sets the “changed” flag, which means that when you call notifyObservers( ) all of the observers will, in fact, get notified. In the example above setChanged( ) is simply called within notifyObservers( ), but you could use any criterion you want to decide when to call setChanged( ).



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