Capturing an event

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You’ll notice that if you compile and run the applet above, nothing happens when you press the buttons. This is where you must step in and write some code to determine what will happen. The basis of event-driven programming, which comprises a lot of what a GUI is about, is tying events to code that responds to those events.

The AWT in Java 1.0 doesn’t use any object-oriented approach. Neither does it use a giant switch statement that relies on the assignment of numbers to events. Instead, you must create a cascaded set of if statements. What you’re trying to do with the if statements is detect the object that was the target of the event. That is, if you click on a button, then that particular button is the target. Normally, that’s all you care about – if a button is the target of an event, then it was most certainly a mouse click and you can continue based on that assumption. However, events can contain other information as well. For example, if you want to find out the pixel location where a mouse click occurred so you can draw a line to that location, the Event object will contain the location. (You should also be aware that Java 1.0 components can be limited in the kinds of events they generate, while Java 1.1 and Swing/JFC components produce a full set of events.)

//: Button2.java
// Capturing button presses
import java.awt.*;
import java.applet.*;
 
public class Button2 extends Applet {
  Button 
    b1 = new Button("Button 1"), 
    b2 = new Button("Button 2");
  public void init() {
    add(b1);
    add(b2);
  }
  public boolean action(Event evt, Object arg) {
    if(evt.target.equals(b1))
      getAppletContext().showStatus("Button 1");
    else if(evt.target.equals(b2))
      getAppletContext().showStatus("Button 2");
    // Let the base class handle it:
    else 
      return super.action(evt, arg);
    return true; // We've handled it here
  }
} ///:~ 

For this example, the simplest action is to print what button is pressed. Some systems allow you to pop up a little window with a message in it, but applets discourage this. However, you can put a message at the bottom of the Web browser window on its status line by calling the Applet method getAppletContext( ) to get access to the browser and then showStatus( ) to put a string on the status line. [56] You can print out a complete description of an event the same way, with getAppletContext().showStatus(evt + "" ). (The empty String forces the compiler to convert evt to a String.) Both of these reports are really useful only for testing and debugging since the browser might overwrite your message.

//: Button3.java
// Matching events on button text
import java.awt.*;
import java.applet.*;
 
public class Button3 extends Applet {
  Button 
    b1 = new Button("Button 1"), 
    b2 = new Button("Button 2");
  public void init() {
    add(b1);
    add(b2);
  }
  public boolean action (Event evt, Object arg) {
    if(arg.equals("Button 1"))
      getAppletContext().showStatus("Button 1");
    else if(arg.equals("Button 2"))
      getAppletContext().showStatus("Button 2");
    // Let the base class handle it:
    else 
      return super.action(evt, arg);
    return true; // We've handled it here
  }
} ///:~ 

It’s difficult to know exactly what the equals( ) method is doing here. The biggest problem with this approach is that most new Java programmers who start with this technique spend at least one frustrating session discovering that they’ve gotten the capitalization or spelling wrong when comparing to the text on a button. (I had this experience.) Also, if you change the text of the button, the code will no longer work (but you won’t get any compile-time or run-time error messages). You should avoid this approach if possible.


[56] ShowStatus( ) is also a method of Applet, so you can call it directly, without calling getAppletContext( ).



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