Making a button

Bruce Eckel's Thinking in Java Contents | Prev | Next

//: Button1.java
// Putting buttons on an applet
import java.awt.*;
import java.applet.*;
 
public class Button1 extends Applet {
  Button 
    b1 = new Button("Button 1"), 
    b2 = new Button("Button 2");
  public void init() {
    add(b1);
    add(b2);
  }
} ///:~ 

It’s not enough to create the Button (or any other control). You must also call the Applet add( ) method to cause the button to be placed on the applet’s form. This seems a lot simpler than it is, because the call to add( ) actually decides, implicitly, where to place the control on the form. Controlling the layout of a form is examined shortly.



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