13: Creating windows and applets

Bruce Eckel's Thinking in Java Contents | Prev | Next

and applets

The original design goal of the graphical user interface (GUI) library in Java 1.0 was to allow the programmer to build a GUI that looks good on all platforms.

In this chapter you’ll first learn the use of the original “old” AWT, which is still supported and used by many of the code examples that you will come across. Although it’s a bit painful to learn the old AWT, it’s necessary because you must read and maintain legacy code that uses the old AWT. Sometimes you’ll even need to write old AWT code to support environments that haven’t upgraded past Java 1.0. In the second part of the chapter you’ll learn about the structure of the “new” AWT in Java 1.1 and see how much better the event model is. (If you can, you should use the newest tools when you’re creating new programs.) Finally, you’ll learn about the new JFC/Swing components, which can be added to Java 1.1 as a library – this means you can use the library without requiring a full upgrade to Java 1.2.



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