Designing with inheritance

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//: Transmogrify.java
// Dynamically changing the behavior of
// an object via composition.
 
interface Actor {
  void act();
}
 
class HappyActor implements Actor {
  public void act() { 
    System.out.println("HappyActor"); 
  }
}
 
class SadActor implements Actor {
  public void act() { 
    System.out.println("SadActor");
  }
}
 
class Stage {
  Actor a = new HappyActor();
  void change() { a = new SadActor(); }
  void go() { a.act(); }
}
 
public class Transmogrify {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Stage s = new Stage();
    s.go(); // Prints "HappyActor"
    s.change();
    s.go(); // Prints "SadActor"
  }
} ///:~ 

A Stage object contains a handle to an Actor, which is initialized to a HappyActor object. This means go( ) produces a particular behavior. But since a handle can be re-bound to a different object at run time, a handle for a SadActor object can be substituted in a and then the behavior produced by go( ) changes. Thus you gain dynamic flexibility at run time. In contrast, you can’t decide to inherit differently at run time; that must be completely determined at compile time.

Pure inheritance vs. extension

Downcasting and run-time

type identification

//: RTTI.java
// Downcasting & Run-Time Type
// Identification (RTTI)
import java.util.*;
 
class Useful {
  public void f() {}
  public void g() {}
}
 
class MoreUseful extends Useful {
  public void f() {}
  public void g() {}
  public void u() {}
  public void v() {}
  public void w() {}
}
 
public class RTTI {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Useful[] x = {
      new Useful(),
      new MoreUseful()
    };
    x[0].f();
    x[1].g();
    // Compile-time: method not found in Useful:
    //! x[1].u();
    ((MoreUseful)x[1]).u(); // Downcast/RTTI
    ((MoreUseful)x[0]).u(); // Exception thrown
  }
} ///:~ 

As in the diagram, MoreUseful extends the interface of Useful. But since it’s inherited, it can also be upcast to a Useful. You can see this happening in the initialization of the array x in main( ). Since both objects in the array are of class Useful, you can send the f( ) and g( ) methods to both, and if you try to call u( ) (which exists only in MoreUseful) you’ll get a compile-time error message.

If you want to access the extended interface of a MoreUseful object, you can try to downcast. If it’s the correct type, it will be successful. Otherwise, you’ll get a ClassCastException. You don’t need to write any special code for this exception, since it indicates a programmer error that could happen anywhere in a program.



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