Microsoft Frees Visual Studio Online for occasional Contributors

Microsoft responds to the growth of enterprise application development teams as they allow, what they consider as ‘occasional contributors’ to access the Visual Studio Online project development environment at no cost. "What we learned from our customers is that they need lots of people to participate. There are different levels of involvement in a project that are critical," said Nicole Herskowitz, Microsoft senior director of product marketing for Visual Studio Online.  Visual Studio Online is already free for projects with five participants or fewer. The basic list price for the service starts at US$20 per user per month for each participant beyond the first five. Continue reading this story here.



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