Microsoft Azure too far behind the rest

Google and rival Microsoft are battling on several fronts: search, browsers, operating systems and office software. And the office software front is heating up as Google continues to push Google Docs to the forefront of cloud computing and Microsoft readies to move its ubiquitous Office suite into the cloud as well. However, Dave Girouard, president of Google's enterprise division, tells Computerworld that when it comes to competition, there's Microsoft and then there's ... well, there's Microsoft. But he seems to be really looking forward to locking horns with his Redmond, Wash., counterparts.

In a one-on-one interview, Girouard talks about competing with a company known for its office apps, Google's own growth in the enterprise, and what he thinks Google's advantages are over Microsoft.

What's your strategy for getting Google Docs into the enterprise?
We launched Google Apps as business services in 2007. We have about 25 million unique users. It's not airtight data, but it's predominantly used in businesses. More than 2 million unique businesses are using it. More than 3,000 businesses sign up every day. Probably every few weeks a company that is in the tens of thousands of employees goes live on Google Apps. Those are Fortune 1,000 companies.

Who do you see as your biggest competitors?
There's Microsoft and then there's Microsoft. Obviously, there are multiple competitors, but the one we see the most and talk about the most is Microsoft because they're the gorilla in the market. They tend to have competitive products to what we have. Cisco is kind of getting into this game. And IBM is in there. I would certainly characterize those as far less directly competitive.

How do you compete against a company that has such an enormously popular office application suite?
When people thought mainframes, they thought IBM, but that didn't mean Microsoft couldn't become a big, successful company without building mainframes. Cloud computing is a new game. New leaders will emerge. Microsoft is a great company, but we think we're several years ahead in our ability to build and deliver cloud services that are reliable and useful and secure.

Microsoft is planning on coming out with its own cloud-based office applications. Don't you think a lot of companies will stick with Microsoft because they have a history of using the company's software?
There will certainly be people who will stay with Microsoft because they know them, but those people will fall further and further behind. Microsoft will have to drag the past along with them. They have an enormous economic model to deal with, and that will hurt them. They have to find a way to go from the traditional software licensing model to a cloud computing model, and there has not been a company that has done that yet to date. It's not to say Microsoft can't do it, but they certainly have a lot of challenges to make that happen successfully.

The office software front is heating up as Google continues to push Google Docs to the forefront of cloud computing and Microsoft readies to move its Office suite into the Microsoft Azure platform as well.

View Article



Comments

  • There are no comments yet. Be the first to comment!

Leave a Comment
  • Your email address will not be published. All fields are required.

Top White Papers and Webcasts

  • With JRebel, developers get to see their code changes immediately, fine-tune their code with incremental changes, debug, explore and deploy their code with ease (both locally and remotely), and ultimately spend more time coding instead of waiting for the dreaded application redeploy to finish. Every time a developer tests a code change it takes minutes to build and deploy the application. JRebel keeps the app server running at all times, so testing is instantaneous and interactive.

  • Hurricane Sandy was one of the most destructive natural disasters that the United States has ever experienced. Read this success story to learn how Datto protected its partners and their customers with proactive business continuity planning, heroic employee efforts, and the right mix of technology and support. With storm surges over 12 feet, winds that exceeded 90 mph, and a diameter spanning more than 900 miles, Sandy resulted in power outages to approximately 7.5 million people, and caused an estimated $50 …

Most Popular Programming Stories

More for Developers

Latest Developer Headlines

RSS Feeds