C# Programming Adds Optional and Named Arguments

Earlier this month Redmond released Microsoft Visual Studio 2010, the .NET Framework 4.0 (which includes ASP.NET 4.0), and new versions of their core programming languages: C# 4.0 and Visual Basic 10. In designing the latest versions of C# and VB, Microsoft has worked to bring the two languages into closer parity. Certain features available in C# were missing in VB, and vice-a-versa. Last week I wrote about Visual Basic 2010's language enhancements, which include implicit line continuation, auto-implemented properties, and collection initializers--three useful features that were available in previous versions of C#. Similarly, C# 4.0 introduces new features to the C# programming language that were available in earlier versions of Visual Basic, namely optional arguments and named arguments.

Optional arguments allow developers to specify default values for one or more arguments to a method. When calling such a method, these optional arguments may be omitted, in which case their default value is used. In a nutshell, optional arguments allow for a more terse syntax for method overloading. Named arguments, on the other hand, improve readability by allowing developers to indicate the name of an argument (along with its value) when calling a method. This article examines how to use optional arguments and named arguments in C# 4.0. Click here to read the entire article, C# Programming Adds Optional and Named Arguments



About the Author

Scott Mitchell

Scott Mitchell is the Editor, founder, and primary contributor to 4GuysFromRolla.com. In addition to founding 4GuysFromRolla.com, Scott also created ASPFAQs.com and ASPMessageboard.com. He works as a freelance writer, trainer, and consultant and resides in California.

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