NET Beta 2 - Samples Files Accessibility

Environment: .NET Beta 2

After a successful .NET installation, you are probably frustrated that Visual Studio .NET can't access samples files from the help.

When you select a sample file from the help, Visual Studio .NET requests the CD3 but if you take a look on the CD's, you will quickly notice that the samples files are located on the CD1. Replacing the CD3 from the CD1 doesn't solve the problem because VS .NET always requests CD3! If you copy the samples to another drive, you can't change the drive letter that VS .NET use also if you have a browse button to change it.

The solution to work around this problem is to use the old SUBST command to substitute the drive from where the .NET installation was made to another drive where you copy the samples files. The problem is that you can't substitute the CD letter because the CD already uses it. The solution is to change the CD letter with a free drive letter and do the substitution after. Sometime other application refers to the CD drive letter and it isn't possible to change it.

The best solution is

  • Assign the CD drive letter before installing .NET for example "X:"
  • Install .NET with this CD drive letter
  • Copy X:\Samples to C:\ from CD1
  • Copy X:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio.NET\msdn to C: from CD2 and CD3
  • Add a batch file to the start-up folder with "SUBST V: C:\"
  • Assign the CD drive letter back to another drive (for example "D:")

.NET help and samples is about 1.5GB!



Comments

  • Correction: "SUBST X: C:\"

    Posted by Legacy on 10/18/2001 12:00am

    Originally posted by: Lanz Jean-Claude

    Subst with X, not V if you install from X!
    Add a batch file to the start-up folder with "SUBST X: C:\"

    Reply
  • .NET Beta 2 - Samples Files Accessibility

    Posted by Legacy on 10/17/2001 12:00am

    Originally posted by: Manasi

    Thanks!
    
    This is very helpful

    Reply
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