Automatic Font Handling Class

A while back ago, I realized that I didn't want to fill in the LOGFONT structure anymore, so I created the CAutoFont class, derived from CFont, so it can be used in place of any CFont objects that you may already have in your code. The benifit of the class is that you don't have to fill in a LOGFONT structure, or write out a huge CreateFont command. Simply define a variable of type CAutoFont, with the name of the font you want as its single parameter (Times New Roman, for example), then set its parameters as necessary:

CAutoFont font("Comic Sans MS");
font.SetBold(TRUE);
font.SetEscapement(900);
font.SetHeight(24);
CAutoFont does all of the LOGFONT and CreateFont work in the background, freeing the developer from them. Besides font manipulation functions, CAutoFont also has a function for converting its internal LOGFONT structure into a single string, which is useful if you want to store the font to the registry, for example, and a function to convert the string back. In my opinion, very useful.

I've included a sample project file with the class. Hope it serves somebody as well as it's served me.

Downloads

Download source - 3 Kb
Download demo - 24 Kb


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