DirectX Programming Using DirectX 9, Almost as Easy as MessageBox("Hello world");

This animation took about five lines of source code.

Environment: VC6 Win 9x/ME/2000/XP (DirectX 9 needed); NT will not be supported

DirectX from Microsoft is a mighty and powerful interface, providing the programmer with a lot of functions to do anything you can think of. But the price is that using DirectX (in this case, the 9th generation) is a kind of an enigma to most programmers who might need it for home use.

That's the point where I come in!

I got fed up of writing the same routines every time I needed them. So, I decided to encapsulate the most common functions into a small class. This was when I first started with programming DirectX 7.

This class grew and grew over time and now we've reached DirectX 9. The class reached a state where it could be a powerful tool for almost everybody out there who knows how to program a simple dialog. Much more knowledge is not needed to use DirectX 9 with my class. It would be a good addon to download some more DX tools from my Web site, but the class that can be downloaded here supplies you with the following items:

  • DirectDraw
  • Direct3D (Prelit and dynamic lights, fog, Effects, Alphatransparence, Stencilbuffer, Zbuffer, etc...) in addition to some more of my helper classes, even Bumpmapping and Environmentmapping
  • DirectSound
  • DirectInput (Also ForceFeedback)
  • DirectPlay
  • DirectVoice

Simply create an object of my class and call SetParent(...); the whole world of DirectX will be available to you without endless hours of not understanding how the interfaces work. If you don't believe, take a look at the downloads available at and see what I've done with this class in a couple of hours or days.

I wish you a good time and much success by doing whatever you feel like.

Shots from T. Bock.


Download source - 47 Kb


  • What is this thing anyway??

    Posted by HSmith on 04/26/2005 03:14pm

    There is nothing 'easy' contained herein. I spent hours messing with this project source code. It was apparently written using the 8.1 SDK Appwizard as it is relying on files only it generates. I attempted to get this going reverting back to SDK 8.1, then attempted with 9. What a nightmare. Complete waste of time. Also, it attempting to compile this code, I realized the MS has hardcoded the version #s in the data structures! What kind of monkey business is that? Spare me. If that is what Directx is all about, I can tell you where it is being sent, directly.

  • GameX

    Posted by Legacy on 02/14/2004 12:00am

    Originally posted by: R.C. Hoetzlein

    Very nice project. We've been working on a similar open-source project to simplify game development for several years now. Much of our motivation recently has been getting game development into a CS curriculum. Check it out: or (mirror site)

  • it's very good

    Posted by Legacy on 05/28/2003 12:00am

    Originally posted by: niceguy

    demo project please....

  • I have made an API, so you write this in 1 line!!!!

    Posted by Legacy on 05/07/2003 12:00am

    Originally posted by: Bill Gates

    it seems you are selling software

  • Unfortunate

    Posted by Legacy on 05/07/2003 12:00am

    Originally posted by: okigan

    Unfortunate but this is a total waste of time.

    I was looking for information how to get DX working
    in "5 lines of code, and this is not it

  • lame

    Posted by Legacy on 05/06/2003 12:00am

    Originally posted by: matt

    what a shameless, cheap, juvenile self promotion of XXX-soft.
    memo to editors: we should have a filter for this kind of cheese.

  • Is this good?

    Posted by Legacy on 05/06/2003 12:00am

    Originally posted by: Jason

    How is this better than the common class included with the DirectX demos? Also, this is totally unstructured.

Leave a Comment
  • Your email address will not be published. All fields are required.

Top White Papers and Webcasts

  • Moving from an on-premises environment to Office 365 does not remove the need to plan for disruptions or reduce the business risk requirements for protecting email services. If anything, some risks increase with a move to the cloud. Read how to ease the transition every business faces if considering or already migrating to cloud email. This white paper discusses: Setting expectations when migrating to Office 365 Understanding the implications of relying solely on Exchange Online security Necessary archiving …

  • Enterprises are increasingly looking to platform as a service (PaaS) to lower their costs and speed their time to market for new applications. Developing, deploying, and managing applications in the cloud eliminates the time and expense of managing a physical infrastructure to support them. PaaS offerings must deliver additional long-term benefits, such as a lower total cost of ownership (TCO), rapid scalability, and ease of integration, all while providing robust security and availability. This report …

Most Popular Programming Stories

More for Developers

RSS Feeds

Thanks for your registration, follow us on our social networks to keep up-to-date