Visual FoxPro: Its Day Has Finally Come

If you were to have taken bets as to when Visual FoxPro would end as a supported, updated product from Microsoft, chances are the dates picked would have been long past. Most people expected this product to wither away many years ago as Microsoft focused on Access and then on SQL Server.

In truth, FoxPro has been a leading product in the use of technology. Many of the OOP features of Visual FoxPro were used as models for some of the later enhancements to the other programming languages at Microsoft. Additionally, Visual FoxPro has a hardcore, loyal user base that has contributed input into the evolution of the product. With approximately 100,000 users, it isn't lacking in an audience.

Unfortunately, the betting is over and the end of Visual FoxPro has been announced. Later this year, Microsoft will release Service Pack 2 for Visual FoxPro 9. That will be the last release related to the core Visual FoxPro database.

Will this be the end of Visual FoxPro?

It will be the end of updates. With FoxPro, however, a lot of functionality comes from the extensibility features and add-ins that the product has supported. Microsoft has decided to allow this extensibility to continue even if the core of Visual FoxPro won't. The extensibility features of Visual FoxPro will be posted to CodePlex.com. It is worth noting that according to Microsoft, 70 to 80 percent of all new features have come from community suggestions. As such, the move of the extensibility features to CodePlex could result in continued evolution of the extensions.

While there will not be future editions of Visual FoxPro, support will continue under standard Microsoft support guidelines. This means that you have until around 2015 before support could go away.



About the Author

Bradley Jones

Bradley Jones, in addition to managing CodeGuru, Brad! oversees the Developer.com Newtwork of sites including Codeguru, Developer.com, DevX, VBForums, and over a dozen more with a focus on software development and database technologies. His experience includes development in C, C++, VB, some Java, C#, ASP, COBOL, and more as well as having been a developer, consultant, analyst, lead, and much more. His recent books include Teach Yourself the C# Language in 21 Days, Web 2.0 Heroes, and Windows Live Essentials and Services.
Google+ Profile | Linked-In Profile | Facebook Page

Comments

  • There are no comments yet. Be the first to comment!

Leave a Comment
  • Your email address will not be published. All fields are required.

Top White Papers and Webcasts

  • With JRebel, developers get to see their code changes immediately, fine-tune their code with incremental changes, debug, explore and deploy their code with ease (both locally and remotely), and ultimately spend more time coding instead of waiting for the dreaded application redeploy to finish. Every time a developer tests a code change it takes minutes to build and deploy the application. JRebel keeps the app server running at all times, so testing is instantaneous and interactive.

  • Ever-increasing workloads and the challenge of containing costs leave companies conflicted by the need for increased processing capacity while limiting physical expansion. Migration to HP's new generation of increased-density rack-and-blade servers can address growing demands for compute capacity while reducing costly sprawl. Sponsored by: HP and Intel® Xeon® processors Intel, the Intel logo, and Xeon Inside are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries. HP is the sponsor …

Most Popular Programming Stories

More for Developers

Latest Developer Headlines

RSS Feeds