Implement a Console Window Using Edit Control

A console applicaton, such as a telnet emulator, needs to implement a console window for the user to type commands. It is not that easy to code everything that a text editor does. Windows' edit control does everything for us, so why do not use it?

The following example indicates how to do this. CConsoleBox derives from CEdit. By customizing several standard behaviors, it works like a console.

Above is a demo to show how to use CConsoleBox. What the user types will be converted to upper case and echoed back at the console.

The user can call back previously typed commands by pressing the Up/Down keys.

Note: Not all "key combinations" and "Windows command messages" are implemented. You need to write your own code to do what you want.


Downloads

Comments

  • Use ?

    Posted by krishnadevan on 06/16/2004 02:20am

    Hi I like it . But what is the use of it ? any commands can be executed .. u have to create some pipes to connect it with comand.. Hopes u will do it

    • This is what I wanted

      Posted by j_sharan on 02/23/2006 02:48pm

      I was looking for a code like this, Thanks shang.

      Reply
    • Program crashed

      Posted by bikejog on 12/16/2004 12:40pm

      Under Windows XP, the supplied .exe crashed if I presses the UP Arrow repeadily. Just launch application then press the UP Arrow Key repeadily. It crashes.

      Reply
    • Useful

      Posted by iamahorse on 09/21/2004 09:43pm

      I just want this.

      Reply
    • Demo has no use

      Posted by shallyee on 06/19/2004 09:29am

      The demo has no use, just hint. If you are writing something like telnet emulator, command base calculator, etc, the class may help you.

      Reply
    Reply
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