Slider Button Control

Synopsis

I was developing an image editor and found my dialog boxes cluttered with edit boxes, spin buttons and sliders. I thought the slider edit box that Adobe Photoshop had was cool and saves spaces. I decided to make my own, and so, here is my Slider Button Control. The code was based on several examples I found in codeguru. Thanks to all those guys.

Using the Control

The control consists of four files, they are:

  • wcSliderButton.h
  • wcSliderButton.cpp
  • wcSliderPopup.h
  • wcSliderPopup.cpp

To use the control, you will only need to include wcSliderButton.h in your header file.

Step 1 :

Include "wcSliderButton.h" in your dialog's header file. Add an Edit Box to your dialog box and change it to wcSliderButton instead of CEdit..

Step 2 :

Replace the DDX_Control in the DoDataExchange() to DDX_SliderButtonCtrl(pDX, IDC_EDIT1, m_SliderEdit, 0); The fourth parameter determines where the drop arrow button in the edit box will be placed. 0 Right and 1 Left. Note that by having DDX_SliderButtonCtrl in the DoDataExchange, the compiler will complains whenever you invoke the Class Wizard. I haven't any solution to come around this yet. Changes to the edit box can be detected as normal CEdit using ON_EN_CHANGE. 

Downloads

Download demo project - 39 Kb
Download source - 9 Kb


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