Windows 8 has Launched. Now the Real Fun Begins!

Today is the day — The day Microsoft stated that Windows 8 would launch into the retail channel. It is also the day that people will start getting Microsoft Surface RT devices. It is also the day when we'll begin to see if Microsoft's bets in these technologies will pay off. Granted, that might take a few weeks or months to see.

While today was pegged as the official launch, Microsoft did an event yesterday in New York. My co-worker, Darryl Taft over at eWeek, covered the event: Microsoft Windows 8 Officially Unveiled at NYC Event. You can check out his article to see how things went in New York yesterday.

Of course, one of the key success factors that seems to be tossed around these days is the number of applications a store and/or platform has. Microsoft is stating that there are more applications available today for Windows 8 then there was for other platforms when they launched. That's a good sign if true.

As Windows 8 has gotten closer, it seems that more people have started jumping on the Win8 development bandwagon. In fact, I find it fun to try to build something with new platforms. Since developing for Windows 8 uses my existing knowledge, it seemed like it wouldn't be too hard to build an application. As of yesterday, my application written with a bit of C# and XAML can now be found in the Windows App Store. Tile Slider was approved and is now available. Now that I've seen the process, and survived with only a bit of grumbling (apologies to several of my Microsoft friends about that), I'm ready to start working on the next one. My daughter has already approved the concept, so I know I'll have at least one download when I get it built.

I have also worked with one of our writers to have him build an application that can list the articles on CodeGuru. Chris Bennett started working on this application less than two weeks ago. The Developer.com Network Reader application has gone live today! 

Chris has written an article here on CodeGuru (Building the Developer.Com Windows 8 App) to show you what he built and to share the code. Obviously, you can't use the images, but the code is there for you to check out and to see how easy it is to build a feed-driven application. This first edition of the reader application isn't overly complex. We’ll see what can be done to evolve it as time progresses. For now, take a look and see what we have launching!

Windows 8 is here. There is a new style of app. While you might think that the success of a Windows Store App is highly unlikely, just remember, there used to be a bunch of mainframe and corporate guys who though that PC applications would never be successful. With around 8000 apps already in the store and 100,000 targeted by Microsoft in the first year, it seems many people are building applications — or will be. I've done it, so I know it's really not that hard!

# # #

Note that this site does business with companies mentioned in this blog. Note that the opinions expressed in this blog are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of my employer or anyone else.

Your Idea. Your App. 30 Days
Get daily guidance from Generation App for building Windows 8 applications.
sponsored link


Blog Categories

Blog Archives

Comments

  • There are no comments yet. Be the first to comment!

Leave a Comment
  • Your email address will not be published. All fields are required.

Top White Papers and Webcasts

  • Mobile is introducing sweeping changes throughout your workplace. As a senior stakeholder driving mobile initiatives in your organization, you may be lost in a sea of technologies and claims from vendors promising rapid delivery of applications to your employees, customers, and partners. To help explain some of the topics you will need to be aware of, and to separate the must-haves from the nice-to-haves, this reference guide can help you with applying a mobile strategy in the context of application …

  • Savvy enterprises are discovering that the cloud holds the power to transform IT processes and support business objectives. IT departments can use the cloud to redefine the continuum of development and operations—a process that is becoming known as DevOps. Download the Executive Brief DevOps: Why IT Operations Managers Should Care About the Cloud—prepared by Frost & Sullivan and sponsored by IBM—to learn how IBM SmartCloud Application services provide a robust platform that streamlines …

Most Popular Programming Stories

More for Developers

Latest Developer Headlines

RSS Feeds